Category Archives: Travel

Dallas Museum of Art

Free art museum in Dallas Texas

While perusing my Texas guide book, I came across the Dallas Museum of Art. It’s located close to St Paul station on the DART train and the added bonus is it’s free to enter.

Dallas-Museum-of-Art

I didn’t really know what to expect and I was pleasantly surprised. There are quite a lot of rooms, some are very small exhibitions and others are significantly larger. I was impressed by the array of art – from paintings to jewellery and bowls to books. I was also impressed by how global the art was. I saw the works of some very well known artists including Monet, Van Gogh and Frida Kahlo.

Dallas-Museum-of-Art-Monet Dallas-Museum-of-Art-frida-kahlo

This was a really nice couple of hours of looking around at various and eclectic art. I’d recommend it to anyone looking for something chilled out to do in Dallas centre.

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Six Flags adventure park, Texas

I love rollercoasters so I was completely up for visiting Six Flags over Texas in Arlington. We bought tickets online on the same day to avoid queuing up. The car park seemed pretty full when we were trying to find a spot, but luckily there were hardly any lines for the rides when we got in.

The rides were pretty awesome. I really enjoyed the Batman ride, Cat woman whip and the Superman ride. Even the ‘kiddy’ rides were pretty cool! Spinsanity was also great – except we got stuck for 10 minutes on the way down. Luckily we weren’t upside down so it wasn’t too bad!

It was a hot day, but there is plenty of shade and water fountains around. We bought a refillable drink which was handy to stay hydrated throughout the day. And the Aqua man water ride helped to keep us cool!

We were surprised when all the rides seem to stop at around 6pm… turned out there was a thunder storm looming and I guess lightning and high metal rides are not a good combination. It did start raining and there was plenty of lightning and thunder, at which point nearly everyone started to make their way towards the exits. I’m glad we managed to fit in loads of good rides before nature forced us to leave. I’d go back ūüôā

You can check out Six Flags over Texas by clicking here.

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Central London Megabus Tour

Megabus tour in London

Even having lived in London for over ten years, I know there’s always more to see and learn. ¬†I’m already a big fan of the Sandeman free walking tours¬†so I decided to try a London bus tour for a change.

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I found that Megabus has started doing bus tours!  They are already great for cheap coach travel across the UK and US, so I was happy to check out their 2-hour London bus tour with a friend.  Tickets start as low as £1, and you can easily find tickets for £5 per person.

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Here is the info from the website:

See London for less when you experience our non-stop bus tour, which will take you to up to 50 of the capital’s most famous sights in the space of just 2 hours. Prices start from just £1 plus a booking fee.

You’ll be able to get onboard one of our open top double-decker buses in central London every day of the week, every hour between 10:00 and 17:00. And you can start and end your tour from three locations:

  • The London Eye
  • Tower of London
  • Park Lane

Why choose megasightseeing.com for your open top London bus tour?

  • 2-hour tour ‚Äď you‚Äôll see all of London‚Äôs best bits in two hours
  • Non-stop ‚Äď we‚Äôll take you through the city, minus the pit-stops
  • Mega Value ‚Äď prices start from ¬£1 plus a booking fee, subject to availability
  • Seat available upstairs ‚Äď so you get a great view of all of London‚Äôs best bits
  • Easy to use ‚Äď just get on at your choice of three locations
  • Book online – you can book online right up to time of departure
  • Departures every hour ‚Äď find the time that suits you best
  • English Commentary ‚Äď we‚Äôll give you all the fascinating facts about London with a special appearance from Sid.

I booked the tickets online.  I foolishly made some booking errors and was able to correct them easily online for a fee of £2.50.  Our pick up point was at Hyde Park Corner, a couple of minutes from the underground station.  Our bus was late by 15 minutes because of traffic, luckily it was a beautiful sunny day so we waited in Hyde Park.

We sat at the top of the bus and there was a clear recorded commentary throughout the tour. ¬†It was really awesome! ¬†We had great views and went past loads of things like Trafalgar Square, the new Bloomberg building, the Houses of Parliament, St Paul’s Cathedral and the London Eye.

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london-city-buildings-megabus-tour

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Overall, this Megabus tour was definitely a big HIT. ¬†It was cheap, simple to book, easy to find, then you can just sit back and enjoy! ¬†I did learn lots of new interesting info, like the spike monument at London Bridge station (pictured below with the Shard in the background) is to remember all the beheadings that used to take place there… before the heads were placed on spikes along the bridge! ¬†How times have changed!!

spike-monument-london-bridge-megabus-tour

Bear in mind when booking that there are various pick up points. ¬†Make sure you pick the right one! ¬†And take a brolly. ¬†We did get a few minutes of rain, but what’s a summer day in London without a sprinkling of rain??

Click here to book the Megabus London Tour.

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Be flexible with your travel plans (and life)

I called a friend this morning to give him some life advice: It’s ok to change your plans. ¬†He suggested I write a blog about it… so here we are!

I explained that I used to be someone who made plans, committed to them, and had to complete that plan no matter what. ¬†Whether it was committing to a relationship or booking a holiday, I always wanted to see that plan through to the end. ¬†There was no alternative. ¬†And if I couldn’t make that plan happen, it led to a lot of heartache, pain and internal conflict. ¬†Because for me, the plan I’d committed to was the only way.

There were a couple of big things I’d committed to that I really struggled with. ¬†One was a relationship where I found out he cheated but I felt I couldn’t leave. ¬†The other was a job that didn’t play out as I had intended. ¬†When I did eventually leave both of these things, I felt like I had failed because, despite my effort, I did not complete what I had committed to.

What I learned (the hard way) is that sometimes you can’t control everything. ¬†Sometimes circumstances change or you discover new information and that it is, in fact, OK to change your plan to something different. ¬†That’s not failure, that’s being flexible. ¬†You don’t have to stick to your original plan.

Before I went to Costa Rica, I spoke to a friend who’d lived in Colombia for some months. She shared some of her experiences with me, including how she pre-paid to live in a shared house for two months. ¬†When she got there, she absolutely hated it. ¬†She hated the house and the people in it, but didn’t want to leave and lose her money. ¬†She begrudgingly stuck it out. She said she realised now that she should have just accepted the loss of money so she could find somewhere else to stay where she would have been happier. ¬†Staying in a situation she’d committed to but wasn’t happy in wasn’t worth it. ¬†Her advice to me before I moved to Costa Rica? ¬†If you don’t like it, change it.

I did remember her advice in Costa Rica. ¬†I had originally planned to stay for a year or more, but I just didn’t like it (San Jose) as much as I thought I would. ¬†I do remember reviewing my options after six months and realising that I could stick it out for a year or move on. ¬†I thought about my friend’s advice and decided I would be happier if I left. ¬†So I did.

How I wish I could have thought about life in such simple terms when I was stuck in my relationship or that job. ¬†I didn’t have to stay. ¬†I could have just changed my plan. ¬†And not beaten myself up about it. ¬†We always have a choice in life, and staying in a situation that you’re not happy with is also a choice you have made.

Nowadays, I still make plans and commitments, but I know in my heart that it may or may not work out as I planned and I am open to changing my plans if I need to.  Knowing this from the outset makes it so much easier to handle unexpected obstacles and circumstances as they come up.

A book that I found useful and relevant to this topic is the Untethered Soul by Michael Singer.  A great read that I recommend for everyone:

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Heart of Hollywood tour – London O2

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A friend took me to see the Heart of Hollywood that is currently on tour in London until 17th July. ¬†It’s part of a world tour that will cover 60 cities. ¬†I didn’t know what to expect, but it was pretty awesome! ¬†It is a collection of memorabilia from Hollywood, including the original letter ‘H’ from the Hollywood sign, iconic art and some original costumes from movies including Superman.

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The highlight was definitely the one-hour dancing and singing outdoor performance at dusk as the sun set over London.  The performers were really amazing and it was such a lively and eclectic selection of songs.

This was a really awesome and ‘different’ thing to do in London. ¬†It’s located in North Greenwich by the O2 arena so there is easy access and plenty of restaurants nearby. ¬†You can find out more and buy tickets here:

https://www.theo2.co.uk/events/detail/the-heart-of-hollywood-tour

http://www.heartofhollywoodtour.com

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Hawaii inspirational speech

For me, travel makes me feel alive. There’s so much to see and do, and it’s important to enjoy the beauty around you.

I came across a motivational video with scenes of Hawaii. I loved the combination of travel and a reminder to enjoy life.

Here is the video:

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How to travel on a budget

There are times when you have oodles of money to spend on a luxury trip.  Those are always great!

But there are also times when you really want to go somewhere, even though you feel like you can’t¬†really¬†afford it. ¬†Fear not. ¬†Where there’s a will, there’s a way! ¬†From my experience, travelling on a budget is still worth the experience. ¬†You might not be eating caviar everyday (who wants to do that anyway?) but you still get to visit somewhere interesting and build some great new memories.

The biggest costs for travelling tend to be for transport and accommodation, so if you want to save money, try to focus on these areas first.  Other costs like eating out do add up, but you can always try to find a balance of paying for nice meals and eating on the cheap.  This applies for touristy things to do as well.

Here are some tips to get you thinking:

  • Book early

From my experience, booking earlier has nearly always worked out cheaper. ¬†From flights to hotels, it’s easier to snag a deal in advance. ¬†I’d say at least three months in advance. ¬†Also, there is maximum holiday anticipation by booking early! ¬†It’s always nice to have a trip to look forward to.

  • Low cost airlines

These are great. ¬†The purpose is to get you from one place to another. ¬†There’s generally not much point in paying extra for that. ¬†Low cost airlines are good for travelling within Europe, and also intra-country like in the US. ¬†You can save a lot of money by travelling with Ryanair or Easyjet instead of British Airways.

You can save money on flights around the world with airlines like JetBlue Airways in the US and AirAsia in Asia.  You can view other airlines in this article about low-cost airlines.

air-asia-low-cost-airlines

  • Shop around for flights

Sometimes there is no low-cost option when you’re making a big trip, like from London to Thailand. ¬†But you might find some cheaper options if you’re willing to make a stop-over (these tend to be cheaper than direct flights) or be flexible with your dates.

If you’re making a big trip abroad that requires a stop-over, it can work out cheaper if you buy the two parts of the flight separately. ¬†For example, a friend of mine travelled from the US to Amsterdam with American Airlines, which required a stop in London. ¬†It worked out cheaper to buy the US-London ticket with AA + a separate ticket from London-Amsterdam with British Airways, compared to booking the whole US-London-Amsterdam combination directly through American Airlines. ¬†So she saved money by booking the two parts of her trip separately, without even looking at the low-cost airlines.

You may need to fly with a big airline to get you to the first country, then look for cheap flights on the shorter parts of your journey.

The best way to shop around like this is using a website like Sky Scanner that does the hard work for you. ¬†Try changing some of the dates around, and make sure you check the time in between flights. ¬†And make sure the agent they suggest is legitimate. ¬†I’ve seen what looked like a bargain but had never heard of the agent and their reviews weren’t good – so I chose a more expensive but safe option.

You can also use websites like Kayak and the regular online agents like Opodo, Expedia and Lastminute.com to shop around for flights. ¬†And the actual airline’s website!

Make sure you get the timings right if you book parts of your flight separately. ¬†You will need to allow extra time to collect your baggage and possibly go through security or check-in again. ¬†To avoid this hassle, see the next point…

  • Travel lightly – hand luggage only

There are lots of benefits to travelling lightly. ¬†You carry less stuff around, you’re forced to be minimalist and you don’t have to pay extra on some flights for checking luggage in. ¬†Low-cost airlines are notorious for charging extra if you want to check in luggage. ¬†Ryanair charges ¬£25/‚ā¨25 for adding a checked bag, which goes up to ¬£40/‚ā¨40 if you add it after booking your flight/at the airport.

No checked luggage is especially useful if you have booked more than one flight through different airlines – you won’t need to wait around at the baggage carousel to pick up your baggage before going to your next flight.

Even if you don’t have another flight lined up, not carrying a suitcase around on foreign public transport is like a breath of fresh air. ¬†Now, I can easily go away for up to five days with just a small rucksack – I used to take a suitcase with me!

And, if you are going to make maximum use of your hand luggage allowance on a flight, make sure your cabin bag is the right size.  Sometimes the maximum size varies from airline to airline, and you might be forced to pay to check in your case if it is too big.

See Ryanair’s new hand luggage allowance rules here.

  • If you fly a lot, remember to collect and use miles

So using airline miles isn’t my strength, but it’s something I keep meaning to make use of more! ¬†Many airlines have their own miles system and are associated with other airlines too. ¬†So you can have an account with American Airlines and still collect points when you travel with British Airways.

I have used my miles to buy a flight from Costa Rica to New York for about $40, and I have also managed to lose about 20,000 points because I didn’t make use of them in time. ¬†Oops.

  • You don’t have to fly

Depending on how big a trip you are planning, you may want to consider other options like coach, train or even ferry.  In Europe, there are options to take Eurostar between the UK, France, Belgium and the Netherlands.  Returns can be as low as £60 (around US$80).

And remember, you don’t even have to go abroad to travel.

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There’s probably a whole bunch of stuff you haven’t seen in your own country, so if you’re on a real budget, consider a trip to a city you haven’t visited before. ¬†Coaches can be really cheap in the US and in Europe. ¬†I’ve booked Megabus tickets for ¬£1 before from London to Manchester, you can’t go wrong for that price!

  • Accommodation

Comparison sites:¬†I recommend Trivago as a first stop to find accommodation. ¬†It’s a hotel comparison site that compares hundreds of venues across different agents for the best price. ¬†Mid-week stays tend to be cheaper.

Hostels:¬†I’ve only stayed in hostels a few times – mainly when I was travelling alone and really couldn’t justify the cost of a hotel room. ¬†Especially when it was literally for just a place to sleep as I planned to be out all day. ¬†It can be a good way to meet people – make sure you have your ‘friendly hat’ on and be prepared to expect the unexpected! ¬†I would recommend you check the reviews and the photos to make sure it is something you are happy with.

I’ve had a couple of great hostel stays including in Boston and Costa Rica. ¬†And they were much cheaper than hotels. ¬†There are often facilities to cook, saving you money when it comes to not having to eat out every day.

You can search for hostels at Hostel World, and sometimes they come up in the results on sites like Booking.com.

Airbnb:¬†I’ve heard mixed reviews about Airbnb although all of my experiences have been pretty good. ¬†It is generally cheaper than a hotel, but make sure you do some comparisons. ¬†It can be good if there’s a group of you as there are options to have an apartment where you can hang out and eat together in a homely setting. ¬†You also have the option of cooking.

My favourite Airbnb was staying on a houseboat in Amsterdam years ago.  It was much more fun than staying in a generic hotel room!

No frills hotels: ¬†I’m a really big fan of ‘budget hotels’ that are part of a chain. ¬†They tend to be simple, clean and you know what you’ll get! ¬†In the UK, I really like Travelodge and in Spain I found Ibis to be great.

  • Things to do

It can be easy to spend lots of money on fun things to do when you’re exploring somewhere new. ¬†I usually pick my favourites of the paid options, like shows or big tourist attractions, then make an effort to find free things. ¬†There are plenty of options, like visiting free museums, looking at markets and even free tours.

I’m a big fan of the Sandeman free walking tours. ¬†These usually last 2-3 hours and you pay a tip of your choice at the end. ¬†This usually works out cheaper than any fixed-price tour. ¬†They currently cover 19 cities around the world. ¬†So far I’ve been to the tours in London, Dublin, Berlin and Amsterdam.

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  • Eating

I LOVE eating out. ¬†Especially when on holiday! ¬†But when you’re on a budget, it helps to plan out those meals a little bit. ¬†Instead of pigging out at the expensive hotel buffet every morning, think about going to a local supermarket to buy some croissants, biscuits or fruits to have for breakfast. ¬†If you have access to a fridge, then you can add milk and cereal to that list. ¬†This will go nicely with the tea and coffee that you (hopefully) already have in your room. ¬†And if there’s a kettle for that tea and coffee, then you might as well buy some pot noodles for the occasional meal or snack.

For lunches and dinners, I find it works to pick out a couple of places you really want to eat at (this should include national dishes/local food), then find cheap alternatives for the other meals. ¬†This includes cafe style restaurants and, god forbid, fast food. ¬†There’s nothing as exciting as having McDonalds in a different country! ¬†(FYI the McFlurry in Morocco is the best I’ve tried so far)

If you have cooking facilities where you’re staying, like in most hostels or Airbnb, then make the most of the opportunity to buy some ingredients from a supermarket and cook some meals.

I’m not saying eat like a pauper for the whole trip, just mix it up a little bit. ¬†Try the whole array from street food to top notch. ¬†You’ll save a lot of money compared to eating in ‘proper restaurants’ each time, and sometimes street food is the best.

You can also look at my travel tips by clicking here.

I hope this post has given you some ideas on how to travel on a budget.  Good luck with your travel plans!

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